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139th MXG rated “Outstanding” , Wing receives “Satisfactory” rating for UCI inspection

After receiving the grade of outstanding after a recent inspection, as promised, Colonel Andy Halter, 139th maintenance group commander, surrendered his hair on stage, January 11, 2010. Capt. Orth and Lt.Col. Gordon Meyer, 139th Maintenance, were happy to oblige the group commander. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Shannon Bond)

After receiving the grade of outstanding after a recent inspection, as promised, Colonel Andy Halter, 139th maintenance group commander, surrendered his hair on stage, January 11, 2010. Capt. Orth and Lt.Col. Gordon Meyer, 139th Maintenance, were happy to oblige the group commander. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Shannon Bond)

St. Joseph, Mo. -- Months of preparation throughout the 139th Airlift Wing was put to the test in January, as two compliance inspection teams graded critical areas of wing operations.

An AMC Inspector General team conducted a wing-wide Unit Compliance Inspection, or UCI, while a similar Air National Guard team put the 139th Maintenance Group through a Logistics Compliance Assurance Program inspection. Wings are required to undergo a UCI every five years.

A UCI is a paperwork inspection that will assess our wing's ability to perform its day-to-day duties. Areas are inspected and graded by measuring and observing the organization's performance.

"I welcomed the opportunity to have the inspections teams here," 139th AW Commander Col. Mike McEnulty said. "We have excellent programs and the teams are here to validate our excellence in these areas."

The main objective of the inspection is to assess areas known as Common Core Compliance Areas (CCCA), which are critical and important to the mission.
The IG team assigned focuses on the validation of the unit's documentation, ensuring compliance among the groups. The grade earned is a snapshot of how each organizational area performs while maintaining compliance to regulations and directives.

Failed unit compliance could result in adverse mission impact. If there is an area that is not in compliance, a plan to correct the deficiency and a target compliance date must be established.

"Constant communication with each (wing organization) kept the ball moving forward at all times," said Lt. Col. Dan Reece, 139th AW exercise evaluation team chief for the UCI. "A lot of guardsmen took time out of their busy schedules to help us out. Not (only) the guard members from within the state, but members across the states."
Members refine their processes in preparation for a UCI.

"This is a measurement of how well a guard member is doing their job," said Tech. Sgt. Jackie Moser, a member of 139th Airlift Wing command support staff.
Reece said fostering relationships with other units preparing for UCIs is paramount in ensuring unit success.

The inspection culminated in a satisfactory rating for the wing.
Meanwhile, the 139th Maintenance Group was under the microscope as well, as its members were also going through a Logistics Compliance Assessment Program, or LCAP.

A team of 20 inspectors and six observers watched MXG members go through their paces, inspecting them on nearly 3,600 checklist items over five days. The inspection is conducted by the Air National Guard for maintenance units every four and a half to five years.

"It's the equivalent to an aircrew 'check ride' for maintenance," said Col. Andy Halter, 139th MXG commander. "This inspection is all about how we do our daily jobs (and if we are) in compliance with the technical directives, safety and resource management."
Halter estimated that there was one inspector for every 10 MXG members present during the January UTA.

Major Brian Silver, LCAP Team Chief, noted the fantastic attitudes and outstanding cohesive leadership maintenance personnel. "With over 300 tasks evaluated in the extreme cold weather, it is rare to have zero direct safety violations or technical order discrepancies." "That's what put the maintenance group over the top for an "outstanding" rating, and Halter a new haircut.

On stage in front of cheering maintenance personnel, Halter followed through with a promise to have his head saved if the group received an outstanding rating.
"I couldn't be more proud of the maintenance team and their hard work," said Halter.