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Hayner named Sr. NCO of Year

Master Sgt. Gary Hayner of the 139th Logistics Readiness Squadron, as he was recently named the Missouri Air National Guard?s Senior NCO of the Year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Michael Crane) (RELEASED)

Master Sgt. Gary Hayner of the 139th Logistics Readiness Squadron, as he was recently named the Missouri Air National Guard?s Senior NCO of the Year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Michael Crane) (RELEASED)

1/8/2009 -- The accolades just keep coming in for Master Sgt. Gary Hayner of the 139th Logistics Readiness Squadron, as he was recently named the Missouri Air National Guard's Senior NCO of the Year.

Hayner represented the 139th Airlift Wing at the state-level competition in Jefferson City in January, after winning at the wing level.

"I was floored," he said of winning the state honor. "I had been to a school and didn't get home until 2 a.m. the day of the board.

"I met the other two individuals competing ... I thought they pretty sharp and well prepared. I just tried to do the best I could (in front of the board), and I probably did on that day ... I felt like I've done better, so I was really surprised when I got the call (that he won)."

And although any airman who makes it to the state competition has a sparkling resume of accomplishments, Hayner's stood out.

In 2008, Hayner helped lead the massive mobility assets movement and also awarded an AMC IG coin during the ORI. Hayner also established a mobile classified storage area for MRSP kits and managed and accounted for more than $50 million in aircraft parts within those kits.

Hayner also is a member of the 139th Airlift Wing Honor Guard, mentors special-needs teenagers at a local high school and volunteers with Habitat for Humanity.

Hayner's package will now compete against the other state and territory winners. Three senior NCOs will be chosen to travel to Washington, D.C., later this winter to compete at the Air National Guard level competition.

"It was a privilege to be able to interview such outstanding airman for the (AOY) program," said Command Chief Master Sgt. William D. Phillips, Chief of the Missouri Air National Guard. "It's really tough because of the competition that was submitted by the units. I can speak for all the board, it's so close, (and) we spend a lot of time thinking about it. I'm really excited and proud of all the candidates the units put forward."